Google Street View goes to the Amazon River

Google is expanding its Street View service into some of the world’s most remote places. They has adapted its existing Street View equipment to be effective in the vast Amazon terrain.

For Google, the project represents the biggest challenge for their Street View equipment, which was first designed to work over well-maintained, modern roads. They also are adding addresses along sections of the Amazon River and Rio Negro in Brazil to its Street View service.


Other locations to become available to check out via Street View in recent months include Pompeii, the Australian outback, the Palace of Versailles, Brazil’s beaches and the plains of Africa.

SAF, a non-profit group, works to promote social, economic and environmental awareness of the Amazon and its indigenous inhabitants – the cultures of whom have been largely inaccessible to the rest of the world.

Google Street View's bike
Google Street View’s bike

‘Soon, you’ll be able to float down the Amazon and Rio Negro Rivers of northwest Brazil and experience some of the most remote and biodiverse areas in the world,’ reads the blog post.

‘In the first phase of the project, the Google and FAS teams will visit and capture imagery from a 50km section of the Rio Negro River, extending from the Tumbira community near Manaus – the capital of the state of Amazonas – to the Terra Preta community.


‘We’ll then process the imagery of the river and the communities as usual, stitching the still photos into 360-degree panoramics.’

Google Street View at Amazonia
Google Street View at Amazonia

Google is also working to capture images of the Amazon rainforest from space. The search giant has teamed with researchers, non-profits, and indigenous tribes to develop and expand tools for mapping and monitoring Earth’s largest rainforest via Google Earth.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here